Friday, 23 September 2011

Terrorism Act 2000 Section 56 offences etc - Letter of 2nd February 2010 to Sir Paul Stephenson and John Yates

Below is the text of a letter sent to both Sir Paul Stephenson and John Yates on 2nd February 2010.

If I were composing the letter today I think I would express myself a little differently but the substance of the letter still appears to me to be sound in Law.

The letter I sent to Sir John Chilcot in parallel on 2nd February 2010 is here: The Iraq Inquiry: Letter of 2nd February 2010 to Sir John Chilcot.


2nd February 2010

To:
Sir Paul Stephenson, Commissioner, Metropolitan Police
John Yates, Assistant Commissioner, Special Operations

Multiple Serious Offences under the Terrorism Act 2000

Gentlemen,

I write to draw to your attention what I believe to be a large number of serious offences under the Terrorism Act 2000 carried out by a significant number of UK citizens who, according to the definition contained in Section 40 of the Act considered in the context of Section 1 of the Act, are “terrorists”.

The Terrorism Act 2000 prescribes a sentence of life imprisonment for some of the offences to which I wish to draw your attention.

I urge you, as a matter of urgency, to investigate these offences and interview the individual terrorists concerned.

In considering whether or not terrorist offences have been committed it is first necessary carefully to examine the definition of “terrorism” contained in the Terrorism Act 2000. Given that you will undoubtedly have access to the text of the components of that definition contained in Section 1 of the Act I will not repeat that text here.

I think that an honest appraisal of that definition can leave no doubt that the UK Armed Forces have carried out multiple acts of terrorism in Iraq and Afghanistan since March 2003, as defined in Section 1 of the Terrorism Act 2000. I would go so far as to argue that the Iraq War per se and the military action in Afghanistan are “acts of terrorism”, albeit on an enormous scale.

Accordingly, Sections 40(1)(a) and 40(1)(b) of the Terrorism Act 2000 indicate that those members of the Armed Forces who participated in those acts of international terrorism are “terrorists”. In addition, other individuals “concerned” with those multiple and serious acts of international terrorism (see Section 40(1)(b)) are also terrorists, as defined in Section 40 of the Act.

If my appraisal in that regard is correct (that multiple “acts of terrorism” have been carried out by UK citizens), then the question arises as to which offences specified in the Terrorism Act 2000 have been carried out and by which individual terrorists. I offer the following list as illustrative of the terrorists (as defined in Section 40 of the Act) who I believe to be UK citizens and to have committed specific offences under the Terrorism Act 2000. The list does not attempt to be exhaustive, either with respect to listing individual terrorists nor with respect to listing all terrorist offences of the individual terrorists listed.

1. Anthony Charles Linton Blair (sometimes residing at 29 Connaught Square, London) -
offences under Section 56 of the Terrorism Act 2000.
2. James Gordon Brown (known to frequent 10 Downing Street, London) – offences under Sections 15, 16, 17 and 56 of the Terrorism Act 2000.
3. Alistair Maclean Darling (known to frequent 11 Downing Street, London) – offences under Sections 15, 16 and 17 of the Terrorism Act 2000.
4. Geoffrey William Hoon (believed to spend time in the Westminster area of London) – offences under Section 56 of the Terrorism Act
5. John Reid (believed to spend time at Celtic Park, Glasgow) – offences under Section 56 of the Terrorism Act.
6. Graham Eric Stirrup (believed to spend time at the Ministry of Defence, Whitehall, London) – offences under Section 56 of the Terrorism Act.
7. Michael John Dawson Walker (believed to spend some time at the Royal Hospital Chelsea, London) – offences under Section 56 of the Terrorism Act.

At the risk of stating the obvious, the terrorists listed acted with a large number of others, many of whom committed offences under Section 56 of the Terrorism Act 2000 and who are therefore liable, on conviction, to life imprisonment.

In addition, a much larger number of individuals committed offences under Sections 54 and 57 of the Terrorism Act 2000.

A number of individuals committed offences under Section 59 of the Terrorism Act 2000. I make no mention of Section 59, 60 or 61 offences in relation to the individuals listed earlier since they might legitimately be able to claim that sections 59(5), 60(5) or 61(5), as applicable, are relevant with respect to their actions.

I am copying this letter to Sir John Chilcot, chairman of the inquiry into the Iraq War since its content raises issues about the legality of the Iraq War and its component parts and the legality of actions by individuals interviewed (or yet to be interviewed) by the Chilcot Inquiry.

I would mention that I have no information about the terrorist offences listed (and the large number of additional offences which I do not attempt to list) other than information that is in the public domain. While I am willing to be interviewed on this matter, given that all the information I know of is in the public domain, I can see no useful or legitimate purpose that can be served by interviewing me.

To the extent allowed by law, I would be grateful if you would keep me informed about the progress of your enquiries into the activities of the terrorists listed earlier and your progress in identifying others who participated in the acts of terrorism mentioned earlier in this letter and who have committed offences under the Terrorism Act 2000.

Thank you.

Your sincerely



Andrew H Watt

cc. Sir John Chilcot, Iraq Inquiry


Addressees:

Sir Paul Stephenson
New Scotland Yard
London
SW1H 0BG

Mr John Yates
New Scotland Yard
London
SW1H 0BG

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